It’s been a while since I wrote–journaling, in particular. Back in college, my notebooks weren’t just for note-taking in during lectures. I filled most pages with my random ramblings, rants, doodles and all that shit. My penmanship looks like a bunch of signature 😀 But it didn’t stop me to keep writing. My writing looked like scribbles and I didn’t really care. I can understand it and that’s what’s important. There was no social media back then (well, there was Friendster). And blogging wasn’t exactly so popular so writing on a journal (or semi-journal) was kind of my thing.

You know, one good thing about writing is the pen. I remember “borrowing” my mom’s Sheaffer fountain pen when I was a kid. And she’d get mad at me when she can’t find it hahaha. Writing with a fountain pen is a such satisfying experience, especially how it gives variation to the lines–something a regular ballpoint pen or a sign pen lacks.

Well, I didn’t really know what happened exactly after that so I completely just gave it all up. Just like that. Until recently when my sister, who came back from Italy, gave me a Kaweco Liliput with a Fine nib. Like OMG! I didn’t really get to own one until that day and I’m so happy!

Kaweco Liliput AL Fountain Pen Silver
Kaweco Liliput AL Fountain Pen Silver (F)
A tiny but mighty one.

The Kaweco Liliput AL fountain pen is, well, made of aluminum with a steel nib. It’s small with a screw cap that makes the pen longer when posted (capped). Oh, did I say it’s a screw-on cap? Yeah. It’s additional work but just love that it isn’t so huge (it’s a pocket pen) and that the nib is so beautiful. It came with a short standard ink cartridge of the same brand. I would’ve loved it even more if it came in black. The ink is blue, and it’s running out real fast. Good thing is, a friend of mine was into fountain pens too, so she gave me two sets of Kaweco ink cartridges which is Pearl Black. Yay!

How it feels?

You know those oddly satisying videos you can watch on YouTube and how it calms you while you watch them? It feels exactly like that. At least for me, that is. The moment the nib touched the paper and the lines are drawn, it all came back. Writing on actual paper was something I really missed. And from then on, I make it a point that I write something at least once a day.

How was the actual experience from unboxing to writing?
  1. Unboxing – The box (or semi-box) was a nice touch. The tin box the pen was in can make do without it though, imho. The pen was all set up. I just had to uncap to see the nib (oh it’s so ganda). The short cartridge was, well, short. You can see how short it is (added a 1 PhP coin beside it for reference). It was my first time to see a cartridge that small.
  2. Setting up the pen – I flushed the pen out first, based on what I’ve read. Then I put the cartridge in, of course. I let it sit for a few minutes to allow the ink to flow into the feed then to the nib.
  3. Writing – At first, I thought the pen writes a little dry, compared to my mom’s fountain pens I used in the past. Apparently, I was just too exicted hahaha. It doesn’t feel dry anymore a little bit later. But there’s the challenge of getting used to it. I haven’t written a lot of stuff for a long time so I think my hand hurt a bit (I use gel pens mostly) after writing a few lines. As I used it more, my hand started to feel as if I’m no longer holding a writing instrument. It feels more natural now.

The aluminum Liliput is what I constantly use now when taking notes for work (I like it better that way, than typing on my phone) or when I doodle some lines or scribbles. It’s also therapeutic so when I’m a bit stressed out, I just write my thoughts in 3 separate journals. Yeah, I’m not organized 😀

Anyway, I now feel as if I need to get more paper to write on, and I might just buy more pens. I’m seriously going to be bankrupt! But who cares? Haha! Although, I’d have to reconsider other brands. I’m actually looking at a few inexpensive alternatives and I might switch to converters and bottled inks as I’d like to extend my efforts on lessening plastic waste (from disposable pens and cartridges). I’m no expert on fountain pens or other fine writing instruments but I’d try to make a more comprehensive comprehensive review next time.

How about you? Do you collect fountain pens as a hobby?